Second Shot in the Arm!

After reading how others are anxiously trying to get their first vaccine dose, I write this with some trepidation. I got my second vaccine shot on February 1. How did I do that? The credit goes to the people of Erickson Living and their corporate response to the pandemic.

Erickson Living is a national company with 20 retirement communities across the country with 15,000 employees serving more than 27,000 residents. When the pandemic hit, protocols to protect employees and residents initiated. For most of 2020, employees delivered meals and necessities to residents. Masking and social distancing were part of everyone’s day.

In December, we moved into one of those communities, Tallgrass Creek in Overland Park, Kansas. Residents and employees have been living with stringent guidelines for nearly a year now.

Erickson and CVS teamed up to plan inoculations once the vaccine was available. We received our first shot on January 11. It was an all hands on deck socially-distanced process with a fifteen-minute waiting period once the vaccine was in the arm, then we were given cards indicating our booster shot would be on February 1. Yet, I remained anxious as news reports on problems getting the vaccine into the arms of people dominated the headlines.

We have heard of people having a day or two of discomfort following their second shot, but so far, we have only noticed some soreness in the arm. Staff from Tallgrass Creek and CVS continue to innoculate residents and employees methodically. After each shot, you hear cheers and noisemakers to celebrate.

Perhaps lessons learned by Erickson Living would make a good case study for the next pandemic.

…that’s 30 for today.

Local Government & Public Agendas

During this pandemic, local governing bodies are on the publics’ hot seat more than ever before. With today’s technology, we can watch the city council and county commission meetings live. I find the public comment sessions most telling about the emotions of those who come to the podium. It is especially evident when the subject matter is masks, lockdowns, or school closures.

Fellow citizens, well-intended as they are, voice opinions based on gossip, social media, and articles they have researched. They speak of medical journal articles they have read and hold to be the final word, despite the testimony of medical experts earlier in the same meeting. Some cite media articles as evidence for their position.

These most vocal citizens gain the attention of those elected officials up for reelection this fall. They are politicians and may fall into the trap that the most vocal speak for the broader community. After watching many of these sessions, I believe they represent only themselves and maybe a few others.

Media coverage of these meetings tends to focus on the drama and outrageous statements. Some feel costumes will help their cause. Today, one woman upset with the commission found it necessary to conclude her comments by saying she recently took firearms training and purchased a gun. I believe this kind of rhetoric is harmful to our community relations.

Our society seems to be in a frenzy as we are facing issues previously unknown to our country. It’s left versus right, urban versus rural, and rich versus poor. Again, I’m, praying for a return to civility.

…that’s 30 for today. Stay safe.

Thoughts on the pandemic.

Photo by Gustavo Fring on Pexels.com

Sure I knew that there is a National Institute of Health, but not very much about their mission. Neither did I pay much attention to the my County Health Department except when I took a food handlers course. That class made me somewhat of a germaphobe as I became aware of the dangers associated with food preparation.

Now, as a septuagenarian living in the age of Covid-19, it is easy for me to appreciate the cautions voiced by the likes of Dr. Fauci. What I don’t condone are those using the spread of the virus for political gain. I believe some politicians are taking advantage of the fears or assumptions some have in this country. They are looking for a short term advantage by promoting what they think their base wants to hear without regard for the facts. While the majority of Americans are looking for leadership.

Seven in 10 Americans also say they trust their governor over the president when it comes to reopening businesses.

NBC News Poll

The pandemic, racial tension, and a spike in violence are taking a toll on our patience. This a volatile time when some common sense and a measure of kindness might help build healthy relationships.

Let’s listen to the experts, wear our masks, and hope for an answer on how to manage this virus.

that’s 30 for now. What are your thoughts?